Dare you tackle gaming's scariest?

How brave a gamer are you? Test your nerve with our selection of games to suit all souls from cowards to sadists and everyone in between.
 
 
 

 

  • If you go down to the woods today...
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Those who feel like they’re… being watched…

    There are few games we can think of that have literally made a grown man run away from his desk in sheer unadulterated fear. Slender: The Eight Pages is one of those games.

    It’s simple – you’re wandering about, you’re picking up… strange… letters, you’re being subtly trailed by one of the most terrifying things the internet has ever created - the Slender Man.

    Thinking about it logically, Slender shouldn’t be as terrifying as it is – but then, you’re not thinking logically when that horrific, bizarre thing is chasing you down.

    Handily, you can play the original Slender release right here for free – so you can actually test just how much terror you can take.

     
     

     

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  • Yep, that's the way to terrify us
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Amateur psychologists… of terror

    The original game has aged to the point of near-irrelevance, the third game was good but missed the mark somewhat and the fourth – while not without its moments – was a bit of a mess.

    But Silent Hill 2, by crikey, is a keeper. It’s clunky and quite old now – it came out in 2001 – but that doesn’t dull the terror you feel throughout.

    It’s a deeply psychological tale of love and loss, riddled with the sort of body horror that will pop up in your mind’s eye just as you’re about to drift off to sleep.

    And there is no way you’ll ever be able to look at a nurse in the same way after playing through Silent Hill 2. Or look at the pyramids at all. Or trust dogs.

    Seriously, if you’ve played it, you know.

     
     

     

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  • Not too scary, still fun though
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: People who don’t actually want to be scared

    While the original Resident Evil games at least tried to maintain some level of ‘survival horror’, the series has veered so far into all-out action territory that it’s hard to drop any H-bombs when talking about Resi 6.

    No, this is an action game with the pretence of horror about it - a game that will make you jump once or twice, but is far more likely to make a helicopter crash through a building and distract you with shouting and explosions.

    Basically, Resident Evil 6 is the game you want to play if you don’t actually want to be scared this Halloween.

     
     

     

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  • It really is a stupidly scary game
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Nobody, at all, ever

    Amnesia is such a trite core concept that it’s hard to get up any real enthusias… did you hear something? No? Just us? Okay.

    So Amnesia starts with you having lost your memory – obviously – and you have to do some boring nonsen… we’re pretty sure we heard something that time.

    Is that…? No, sorry…. Mind playing tricks on us again. It’s been like this a while since we played The Dark Descent. No idea why, mind, it’s not like the game scared us for long.

    Sure, that was only because we refused to play more than 10 minutes of it because it was an absolute ordeal of terror, but who’s keeping count here?

    No, Amnesia isn’t worth your time. At least not if you want to sleep ever again.

    Sequel Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs is also likely to terrify you and probably ruin your day, but it’s not quite as utterly terrifying as the original.

     
     

     

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  • Well, that's just not very good framing
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Photography enthusiasts

    We all know old cameras are haunted – that much is obvious. They’re soul-stealers, after all.

    But did you know they can actually be used to battle ghosts? Ghastly apparitions that appear when you look through the viewfinder and try to murder you from their spectral realm beyond the grave?

    Yeah, old cameras do that too, according to Project Zero II (Fatal Frame in the US).

    But it’s not just the photography – it’s the fact that the game is deeply unsettling, relying on that whole ‘did I just see something move?’ element we know (and hate) so much.

    There’s no word yet on whether a sequel’s coming where you wield a DSLR as your main weapon and whack out some selfies on your smartphone to replenish your health.

     
     

     

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  • Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Those who fear regional accents

    Are you a child of Received Pronunciation? Raised on a diet of the Queen’s English? An avoider of glottal stops? Then Papa Sangre II might well put t’fear of god into you.

    You see, this audio horror experience for iOS devices doesn’t rely on those old fashioned things like showing you stuff to scare you – no, it relies on the narration of one Sean Bean.

    The game itself is a unique experience, with players relying on audio cues to navigate their way through the afterlife of Papa Sangre. Obviously.

    It might even spook you a bit if you are fond of the Steel City brogue, to be honest.

     
     

     

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  • Shocking to the system, is System Shock 2
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Those suffering severe technophobia

    There’s no way a computer could ever turn against its human masters and become an evil, beastly hybrid-creating monster, right?

    Right?

    System Shock 2 – of which the Bioshock series is a spiritual successor – set the bar for horror games high, and it hasn’t lowered much since.

    But it’s the inclusion of the cyborg midwives that makes System Shock 2 stand out more than it otherwise would for us.

    These horrifying half human, half robot beasts were… ugh. No words, just a body-jarring shudder.

    The first time you’re threatened with your spine being ripped out by what is, ostensibly, a medical practitioner – that’s a moment you don’t forget.

     
     

     

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  • Dark Souls: scarily hard
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Actual, real life sadists

    Now don’t get us wrong here, Dark Souls isn’t the scariest game around – it’s creepy at times, sure, and there’s an atmosphere of foreboding that’s hard to ignore. But scary? Nah.

    What is scary about it is the sheer amount of difficulty the game lobs in the direction of players – it’s scary that its developers thought it was normal to put this much pressure and punishment on a bunch of essentially normal human beings.

    Sure, Dark Souls is a game that makes life worth living if you master it – and you have our unending respect if you have finished the game – but it’s one monster sadist for what it puts you through.

     
     

     

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  • Aiee! A spooky skellington
    Ian Dransfield
    By   | Games editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 October 2013, 14:27 GMT

    Perfect for: Those questioning their sanity

    When we first played Eternal Darkness on the GameCube, we thought we wrre getting into little more than a Resident Evil rip-off with a sort of time travelling mechanic.

    Then the weird things started happening, and we didn’t know what was going on. The volume on our TV appeared to turn down. We lost the picture. The game crashed for seemingly no reason, then started working again.

    Some say all these things were down to how Eternal Darkness was designed in order to make us uneasy and that we should stop being utterly terrified of our GameCube, but we won’t listen to them.

    No, it’s much safer to have the console buried in the back garden surrounded by protective gooseberries and three bushels of holy sage.

     
     

     

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Vikki Blake

wants to go it alone

Shooting things dead, while a hell of a lot of fun, is not the be-all-and-end-all of a gripping multiplayer experience"

 

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