Retro: 10 Amiga games we want on Android

Amiga games are on their way to Google Play later this year: here’s 10 we have to see.
 
 
 

 

  • Next person to say "war's never been so much fun" gets court martialled
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    We’re still waiting for a proper follow up to Sensible Software’s cute-yet-harrowing action strategy masterpiece.

    Yes, Cannon Fodder 2 filled a gap as a glorified map pack, and we technically have to acknowledge the awful Cannon Fodder 3 exists – but that’s besides the point.

    Anyway, the original. It was no pushover – far from it. Mollycoddling Jools, Jops and Stoo through the first eight missions was considered a fear on par with a miracle-worker. Getting them any further and you were positively deified.

    Most players would expect the original set of soldier, and dozens more like them, to be slaughtered throughout the rest of the war. Er, game.

    Look, you weren’t there, man.

    Cannon Fodder ought to lend itself perfectly to touch screen controls too, although those teensy little troops might be a little tricky to pick out on a small screen.

    No matter, we can locate them via their agonised moans. The horror...

     
     

     

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  • You have no idea how happy a simple re-release of this game has us
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    The Victorian era had been thrown into turmoil by a time traveller from the future allowing his knowledge to fall into the unscrupulous hands of Baron Fortesque.

    The only course of action was to send a motley crew – comprising of a navvy, a brigand, a gentleman, a preacher, a mercenary and a thug – to take out the Baron’s army of abominations and eventually shut down his titular doomsday device.

    Such a cool ‘Jules Verne meets Charles Babbage’s difference engine in a shower of brass rivets’ steampunk-type scenario was always likely to activate our nodes.

    Top notch, top-down, Gauntlet-inspired action was the order of the day in The Bitmap Brothers’ penultimate Amiga title, and very fine it was indeed.

    Excitingly, a remastered version is imminent as well.

     
     

     

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  • SWOS, Sensi, Sensible Soccer, whatever you want to call it, it was great. Still is
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    After concerted clamour from Amiga fans, Sensible World Of Soccer arrived on Xbox Live Arcade in 2007.

    Even better, it was SWOS 96/97 (the best version) and even featured a choice of the original graphics or an enhanced upgrade.

    We bought it, again, played it, again, and fell in love with its adorable, fluid take on the beautiful game.

    Again.

    While those bleating about Sensi still being the best football game out there are a little misguided, it soon became apparent SWOS had aged.

    Well raspberries to that, we still think Sensi is ace, and absolutely deserves to land on Android ready for some pocket footy frolics.

     
     

     

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  • The music, it brings a tear to the eye
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    It seems unlikely that this conversion of Taito’s world class platformer will make it to Android, due to various licensing issues.

    But, seeing as Taito refuse to acknowledge the original game (aside from the occasional horrific spin-off), all we can do is pray to the benevolent god of cutesy arcade games that the Amiga version will once again see the light of day.

    Amiga Rainbow Islands is a stellar – if imperfect – conversion of one of the most challenging, rewarding and surprisingly deep games of the 1980s.

    Bub and Bob’s colourful, rainbow flinging antics would be the life and soul of any Android device.

    Plus, that music.

     
     

     

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  • A surprisingly impactful game, even today
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    Geoff Crammond, the brilliant mind behind terrifying puzzler The Sentinel and Microprose’s beloved Formula One Grand Prix series was also the brain responsible for Stunt Car Racer.

    In 1989 it was exciting enough to play a driving game with a small hillock in it, so jockeying for position at speed atop narrow, undulating, vertiginous tracks was a genuine thrill.

    Spills were inevitable, with heavy landings cracking your chassis – on the later circuits simply trying to complete three laps in one piece was a test.

    Lucky gamers with Amiga-owning pals and two tellies could even link up and play head-to-head – far more exciting than trying to best the dispiritingly flawless CPU drivers.

    This would run great on modern hardware too, with more powerful hardware resulting in a faster and smoother experience than first time around.

     
     

     

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  • One BT Games writer used to play this with his brother, with neither understanding what was going on
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    Who’d have thought that a French take on a Belgian comic about the American Civil War could be the recipe for a hilarious strategy computer game?

    All right, apart from you, smarty-pants.

    As with Cannon Fodder, North And South is a lighthearted take on a very messy business, though this game’s tone is more Carry On Sectionalism, and lacks Cannon Fodder’s darker satire.

    A portion of North And South is spent moving tokens around a map of the USA circa 1861, but that’s not the fun part. No, this rolled up when the warring factions meet on the battlefield.

    Pitched battles, train robberies, stronghold assaults and many other games played out in each side’s quest for victory. And if you wanted, the South could indeed rise again.

    North And South is a unique title, best enjoyed by two players who are happy to view one of world history’s more significant events through the medium of slapstick action and daft sound effects.

    The iOS and Android versions exist, but we want the original – none of these silly updated graphics or anything.

     
     

     

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  • Press T to make their trousers fall down. No, really
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    In 1987 fighting games were simple, with fireballs, hundred hand slaps and six-button control schemes but a twinkle in Capcom’s eye.

    A pure test of skill, timing and reactions between one martial artist and anoth… hold on. Who’s this in the blue pyjamas?

    System 3’s IK+ added something crazier than health meters and hurricane kicks: a third combatant.

    We don’t mean that there was some sort of character select screen either, each IK+ match involved three combatants simultaneously.

    It worked tremendously too, with the staid focus of its two-player predecessors gone in favour of intense bouts of three-way headbutts, roundhouses and groin punches.

    Programmer Archer Maclean stuffed the game with secret treats too, as well as a couple of hilarious, bomb-infused bonus stages.

     
     

     

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  • Yes, that is what it looks like, but it's a great game
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    No-one delivered a better arcade style shoot-‘em-up on the Amiga than German developer Kaiko, who went for the full, kooky Japanese coin-op experience with Apidya.

    When faced with a family crisis, protagonist Ikuro heeds the advice of his cognitive behavioural therapist and sets himself practical, achievable steps towards attaining his goal.

    That is to say: our blue haired hero transforms himself into a bee before running the gauntlet of gardens, ponds and sewers to save his green-haired wife from the evil sorcerer Hexaae’s poison.

    Obviously.

    Of course all this nonsense is just an excuse for a darned fine blaster, heaving with gruesome enemies and marvellous Easter eggs (a hint: check out the inside of certain bosses).

    Apidya also boasts one fine, eclectic soundtrack courtesy of Amiga maestro Chris Huelsbeck.

     
     

     

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  • At least in the sequel he moved his gun so when he did the laser beam it didn't cut right through his body. That was weird in the first game
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    The pinnacle of Factor 5’s Amiga output, Turrican 2 was a console-style platformer/shooter that showed Commodore's ageing computer could mix it with the new 16-bit consoles on the block.

    Our metal suited hero had access to an arsenal of sci-fi weapons and level after epic level of blasty action that put many of its contemporaries to shame.

    The developers even threw in a three-stage scrolling space shooter tribute into the middle of the adventure, just because they felt like it.

    With the benefit of 22 years’ hindsight and gaming refinements, it’s apparent now that Turrican 2’s level design is, shall we say, sprawling. It does seem the reins were a little too loose in its development.

    Who cares though? We’re too busy listening – as with so many other entries here – to the game’s phenomenal soundtrack. Once again by Chris Huelsbeck.

     
     

     

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  • Swiv was definitely not a swiz
    Leon Cox
    By   | Games writer, BT.com
    Last updated: 31 July 2013, 17:12 BST

    Many nostalgic Amiga-heads would probably plump for Xenon 2: Megablast as their vertical-scrolling shooter of choice, but not us.

    The thing is, Xenon 2 may have had the awesome graphics and that astonishing Bomb The Bass music, but play it today and you’ll find it comes up short when compared to the more exciting and satisfying SWIV.

    SWIV also supports two-player co-op, although no one ever wanted to play the hapless, ground-bound jeep when a bullet-spewing super-chopper was the alternative.

    More great SWIV features? All right then, what about its on-the-fly loading system, eradicating any between level pauses?

    Or how about the dynamic difficulty adjustment that intelligently balanced the game as you played, depending on how good (or bad) you were at it?

    SWIV is a clever shooter that’s aged incredibly well, a perfect fit for Google’s platform.

     
     

     

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Vikki Blake

wants to go it alone

Shooting things dead, while a hell of a lot of fun, is not the be-all-and-end-all of a gripping multiplayer experience"

 

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