Would you take sleeping pills?

A recent poll has found that 9% of Brits have asked their GP for sleeping pills.

 
 
 
  • Turn off technology
    Stephanie Lowe
    By   | Family and Home Editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 25 October 2013, 15:48 BST

    Nearly one in ten Britons have asked their doctor for sleeping pills, according to new research. Millions of us have sleepless nights and modern technology is getting the blame for it.

    According to new research by health brand Potter’s Herbals, 44% of people claim their smartphones and tablet computers hinder their ability to sleep at night.

    16% of people questioned said receiving texts on their mobile phone at night disrupted their sleep, while 9% are kept awake by emails on laptop and tablet computers in their bedrooms.

    Follow our top tips for a peaceful night's rest...

    Reach for the off button

    Many people use the television to fall asleep or to unwind at the end of the day, this is a big no-no.  

    Not only does the light from the TV suppress the production of melatonin (the all-natural nightcap which regulates our sleep cycle), it also stimulates the mind rather than relaxing it.

    So if your favourite TV show is on late at night, record it for another day, and ban the phone from the bedroom - that last-minute check of Facebook or Twitter could be all that's standing between you and a good night's sleep.

     
     
     

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  • Alarm clock
    Stephanie Lowe
    By   | Family and Home Editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 25 October 2013, 15:48 BST

    Us Brits are a dozy bunch, we only catch six hours and 41 minutes shut-eye a night.  A new study, conducted by Travelodge of 2000 UK adults, revealed that 65% of us are one hour and 33 minutes short of the recommended daily amount of sleep, which is eight hours. Avoid being in the sleepy percentile with our top tips! 

    Supress the desire to snooze

    If you rely on an alarm get up as soon as it goes off. Pressing snooze only leads to a groggy feeling.  Though, in theory, if you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm - maybe review your go-to-bed time? 

    Hit the sack before midnight

    Remember, a better quality of sleep occurs in the hours before midnight, so it’s better to go to bed at 10pm and sleep until 6am, than to go to bed at 11pm and sleep until 7am.

     
     
     

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  • Woman in eye mask
    Stephanie Lowe
    By   | Family and Home Editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 25 October 2013, 15:48 BST

    Create a room that's ideal for sleeping

    An ideal sleeping environment is cool, dark and quiet. Consider using black-out blinds or an eye mask to create an environment perfect for catching some zzzz's.

    Make your bed as comfortable as possible

    Your mattress and pillow can contribute to better sleep, too. Ideally, you should have enough room to stretch and turn comfortably.

    If you find you often have a sore back or neck, you may need to invest in a new mattress or try a different pillow. Don't be afraid to experiment with levels of mattress firmness.

     
     
     

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  • Woman relaxing in bath
    Stephanie Lowe
    By   | Family and Home Editor, BT.com
    Last updated: 25 October 2013, 15:48 BST

    Take a nice warm bath before getting into bed

    A sure-fire way to relax and prep your body for sleep!  The warm water can help soothe joints and the time alone can be a great de-stress before bed.  

    Add essential oils 

    Try adding a little extra pamper to your bath with Lavender and Chamomile Roman oils, they are well proved to help with relaxation. 

     
     
     

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