A campaign has been launched to trace Britain’s lost public works of art which have gone missing or been stolen over the years.

Historic England has released details of up to 40 sculptures that have been destroyed, lost or stolen, and is calling on the public to help track down “the forgotten riches of our national outdoor art collection, before they disappear for good”.

Henry Moore's 1969 work, Reclining Figure, said to be worth £3m, was stolen, probably for scrap, in 2005.

Among the notable items is Henry Moore’s two-tonne bronze Reclining Figure (above) which was stolen in 2005. Estimated to be worth in the region of £3 million, it is since thought to have been melted down for scrap.

Trewin Copplestone's fibreglass bulls, created for the Bull Ring in Birmingham, disappeared when the shopping centre was rebuilt.

A set of four two-metre-high fibreglass bulls (above) that featured on the side of the 1963 Bullring shopping centre in Birmingham, and a sculpture known as The Pineapple (below), commissioned by Ford Motor Company for a Basildon housing estate, are also among those with their current whereabouts unknown.

The Pineapple, by William Mitchell and located in Basildon, Essex, was created in 1977 but last seen in 2011 when it was moved into storage.

At 300 metres high, the futuristic beacon Skylon (below) was the icon of the 1951 Festival of Britain, but its current whereabouts remain a mystery.

At 300 metres high, the futuristic beacon Skylon was the icon of the 1951 Festival of Britain, but its current whereabouts remain a mystery.

The Islanders (below), by Viennese artist Siegfried Charoux, was also created for the Festival of Britain.

The Islanders, by Viennese artist Siegfried Charoux, was also created for the Festival of Britain.

Barbara Hepworth's Two Forms (Divided Circle) stood in London's Dulwich Park for more than 40 years until it was stolen in 2011.

Barbara Hepworth's Two Forms (Divided Circle) stood in London's Dulwich Park for more than 40 years until it was stolen in 2011.

Commissioned from German artist Uli Nimptsch for the Silverwood Estate in Southwark in 1961, Neighbourly Encounter (below) literally disappeared overnight.

Commissioned from German artist Uli Nimptsch for the Silverwood Estate in Southwark in 1961, Neighbourly Encounter literally disappeared overnight.

One of the figures from The Watchers, by Lynn Chadwick, was stolen from Roehampton University in 2006.

One of the figures from The Watchers, by Lynn Chadwick, was stolen from Roehampton University in 2006.

“We may have lost more than we know and we feel now is the time to do something about it,” Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England, said.

“A lot of these pieces were commissioned against a background of optimism, good intentions and civic values and a lot of them were of very fine quality.

“Unfortunately, you lose things you don’t understand or treasure, and perhaps, because nobody was standing up for this kind of art, the result is some of it has been lost.

“This is a call to arms for all of the public to get involved.”

Historic England has released a gallery of more lost artworks and is asking people to get in touch if they know what happened to any of the pieces.

Those with information or pictures can email outthere@HistoricEngland.org.uk or call 0207 973 3295.