In the ever-changing world of high-tech gadgets and gizmos, a whole load of jargon is thrown our way that many of us don’t necessarily understand. One that you may often hear but not know the meaning of is cached data.

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What is cached data?

Cached data is information which comes from a website or an app that is stored on your computer, smartphone and tablet.

This data is stored on your machine, so that the next time you go to use it, it’ll already be available.

Why does cached data do this?

The simple reason is to save on loading time. A website, for example, might save data about the website’s layout on your PC. By doing this, it means your computer won’t have to load it from the internet all over again next time - it’ll already be there on the machine, which is much quicker.

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Does cached data take up space?

Yes, the downside to cached data is that it is taking up space on your device, which means you should probably clear it every now and again.

Cached data is useful for websites you visit regularly, but it’s a waste of space for websites you visit once.

How can I clear my browser’s cached data?

Android:

To clear the cache on an Android device, you’ll need to go to the settings for each app. Remember, some of this data may include previous searches or login information that you may find useful, so be sure that you want to clear it.

Go to Settings by swiping down from the top of your screen, and then clicking the cog icon.

On the Storage page, tap Apps. From here, choose each app and tap the Clear cache button.

If you've got an Android phones, the steps may vary depending on the manufacturer and version you are running. A search for Storage should help you find it.

Apple iOS: For instructions on how to clear cached data on an Apple device, click here.

PC: Click here for instructions on how to clear cached data from a web browser.

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