Companies are continuously refreshing their image to keep up – sometimes radically, other times ever so subtly. 

In 2015 Google had a makeover. The web giant shed its previous ‘serif’ typeface for a bolder, cleaner font, which is now used across all Google-branded products. Google says it made the changes in response to growing usage away from the traditional PC.

We look at some evolutions in tech logos and find out why they occurred.

[Read more: 15 tips for faster Google searches]

Facebook

Facebook

The social network reworked its logo a few months back, although the modifications were ever so minimal. The font turned slightly thinner, with the ‘a’ changing more radically than the rest of the typeface and the ‘b’ getting a stem. Facebook said the update was carried out to make the logo “feel more friendly and approachable”. Did it work?

Read more: Facebook Stories: What is it and how does it work?

BBC

BBC

The BBC logo has taken on a number of forms over the years. Between the ‘60s and mid-‘90s the corporation had a slanted logo in place, but with the arrival of digital television and the internet it became unsuitable on-screen as diagonals create pixilation problems. So, by 1997 it was decided to straighten up the boxes and letters, creating the logo we still see today.

Read more: Tips to get more from BBC iPlayer

Spotify

Spotify

Spotify left observant users puzzled in June this year, when it decided to change the shade of green used for its logo. Some were so outraged by the lighter and brighter colour that they took to Twitter to complain. The company didn’t have any particular reason for the update, saying it felt that “the dreary brand palette was desperate for an upgrade”.

Read more: What is Spotify?

Firefox

Firefox

The changes made to Firefox’s logo is another example that boggles the mind. Admittedly, the web browser did refer to the update as more of a “logo evolution” but the ever so slight removal of gloss and detail begs the question: why? Similar to Google’s reasons, the modifications were carried out to reflect its evolution into a browser for smartphones and tablets, as well as computers.

Read more: Firefox losing its spark? Try these tips to make your web browser faster

Microsoft

Microsoft

One of the more radical redesigns – and arguably, much needed - came from Microsoft in 2012. The software maker dropped its 25-year-old logo for something completely different with a touch of familiarity. For the first time in the company’s history an image was put alongside text, which represented the four coloured squares typically seen on Windows products. Meanwhile, the text was cleaned up and less bold than the previous logo. The revamp was triggered by the launch of Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 which followed soon after.

Read more: The history of Microsoft Windows: 30 years of Windows from Minesweeper to Metro 

Twitter

Twitter

Twitter seems to like limiting words, so much so that it decided to do away with the written bubble-text form of its logo altogether. Instead, it wanted its iconic blue bird logo to fly solo. But even though written ‘Twitter’ was gone, the ubiquitous bird had some changes of its own - bigger wings, no hair and facing upwards were among the tweaks put in place. The move went ahead to make the bird “the universally recognizable symbol of Twitter”.

Read more: Guide to Twitter etiquette