There are so many gems to discover across the globe but not enough time to see them all. Among them are World War I sites across France, Belgium and beyond – and although you can’t beat seeing them with your own eyes, you can always use the likes of Google Earth and Google Street View to explore them from home instead.

Here are some of the best WWI sites we’ve found:

Thiepval Memorial

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There are a number of WWI memorials throughout France and you’ll find one of great significance at Thiepval in northern France with almost 73,000 names of missing British and South African soldiers engraved on an arch monument.

The site was a German stronghold which was stormed on the first day of the battle of the Somme, July 1, 1916 – also known as the ‘bloodiest day of the British army’, after more than 40,000 British soldiers were killed, injured or taken prisoner.

 

Le Linge

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The battle between July 20 and October 15 1915 on a hilltop in the Vosges Mountains resulted in 17,000 deaths, yet it’s one that is sometimes forgotten.

Today, there stands a memorial in honour of those who lost their lives during the bloody battle.

 

Fort de Loncin

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The Fort de Loncin is situated just outside the Belgian town of Liège, where you’ll find some interesting remains after 12 tons of explosives were dropped on August 15, 1914.

Although nature has carried out its duty, you can still see remnants of what used to stand there including some remaining structurers.

 

Lochnagar Crater

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The Lochnagar Crater is the biggest of its kind on the western front. It was created by the British and sprung on at the beginning of the battle of the Somme on July 1, 1916.

Today you can visit the 98ft deep and 330ft wide crater.

 

Dodengang/Trench of Death

Dodengang

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The ‘Trench of Death’ in Dixmude is the only remaining original part of the Belgian Army’s trenches from WWI. Shelters, firesteps and concrete sandbags are among the preservation.

 

Fort Breendonk

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This military fortification is now used as a memorial site in Belgium, but it’s best known as a Nazi prison camp during WWII.

In WWI Fort Breendonk was attacked on October 1, 1914 by howitzers, after Belgium refused to allow the Germany army passage to invade Paris.

 

The Cenotaph

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No tour of World War I monuments and sites would be complete without a visit to London’s Cenotaph.

The war memorial was first unveiled on November 11, 1920 and is mainly used as the centrepiece for the annual Service of Remembrance.