A robot can 3D print the shell of this house in just eight hours.

PassivDom house (PassivDom)
(PassivDom)

The roof, walls and base are printed simultaneously and constructed by manufacturer PassivDom at its US factory, with the company preparing to ship next month.

[Read more: What is 3D printing?]

It can be transported to its final location where windows and doors are added and internal decorations and engineering systems are installed.

The PassivDom 3D printed property
(PassivDom)

The home comes with an inbuilt electric supply thanks to roof-mounted solar powers and batteries meaning it is fully autonomous and enabled for off-the-grid living. It does not need to be connected to the mains.

The PassivDom property also comes with a 211-gallon water storage and filters for using any water, such as that from a river or lake, safely.

PassivDom house
(PassivDom)

The studio home – where the sofa folds out to become a bed – starts from $64,000 (£48,000) according to the firm’s website. The price does not include US taxes and delivery costs.

The space includes the living room studio, a kitchen, and one bathroom.

The kitchen includes a microwave oven, fridge, dishwasher and coffee machine. The bathroom houses a combination washer/dryer as well as a toilet, sink and shower.

The PassivDom 3D printed property
(PassivDom)

A larger property which comes with a separate bedroom is available for $97,000 (about £73,000). It is also printed by the robotic technology and finished on site.

A statement on the company’s website explains: “We manufacture PassivDom at our production facilities in Nevada. You buy completely ready solution – like goods in (a) store. It takes one day for house delivery to the necessary location.”

PassivDom house (PassivDom)
(PassivDom)

Whichever size buyers opt for, the little home packs a punch with its green credentials. It has the best “thermal characteristics and is the warmest residential building in the world” according to the Guinness Book Of Records.

The home is made from carbon, and PassivDom says that with no corrosive materials the module’s life cycle is more than 40 years.

PassivDom initially started in Ukraine but is now also based in the US.

It says that as their house needs no foundations it can be easily moved and relocated, should the owner wish.

PassivDom house on a trailer (PassivDom)
(PassivDom)

[Read more: Ford is trialling 3D-printing of large car parts]